Easy A

My sisters (19 and the other, a month shy of 22) along with my mother and I, saw ‘Easy A’ tonight. Apparently it’s supposed to be a funny, cute, “romantic comedy.” Don’t get me wrong, parts were very funny – especially Stanley Tucci’s character. Also, I do really like Emma Stone, she’s as cute as a button (in my opinion she has taken over as the “it” red-headed girl in Tinseltown, due to Lindsay Lohan’s lack of interest in any sense of normalcy) but overall, this movie rubbed me the wrong way.

Although it was funny at times, I honestly thought it was inappropriate. Now, I’d like it to be known that I am not a huge lameO, and I do have a sense of humor. I just thought this movie had the wrong message. I guess I should say *spoiler alert* here…

So, Riahnnon begs the information out of Olive played by Emma Stone (Riahnnon is Olive’s best friend) – that Olive slept with the made up “George” over the weekend. It was a one night stand and yes, she lost her virginity. News quickly spreads and soon everyone knows that Olive did some “growing up” over the past weekend. Next thing you know, Olive is helping out her gay friend, Brandon, by pretending to have sex with him at a party (which their whole high school is obviously at). One thing lead to another, and boys are lining up at Olive’s locker hoping to improve their reputation by saying they slept with Olive in exchange for gift cards.

Olive continues to help these guys, even takes the blame for her favorite teachers wife, the school guidance counselor, who’s cheating on her husband and in doing so, gives one of her students Chlamydia… Ok so, blahblahblah, moral of the story is Olive gets sick of people calling her a slut, tramp, etc. etc. She wants her ‘good’ reputation back, especially because she’s lying about all of these sexual exploits. I guess she does get her ‘good’ reputation back in the end because she comes clean to everyone? All I know is that she ended up with the boy she’d like since 8th grade, who just so happened to be the the cutie from Gossip Girl, Penn Badgley.

What I took away from this is – WHY do they make movies like this when they know impressionable young girls are going to see it?! I mean, I guess the real question is why are the parents letting these young girls see the movie in the first place?! I could understand if only adults were allowed to watch this – as a 24-year-old woman, I could appreciate the humor in the movie. I could sense the heavy tone of sarcasm, the humorous interpretation of The Scarlet Letter, but could the twelve-year old’s sitting in the same movie theater understand these themes as well?

No.

My mom and I ran into the bathroom quick after the movie and while we were washing our hands we heard two adorable young girls, probably eleven or twelve giggling saying “What is Chlamydia? I don’t even know.” I wanted to give them a hug and say, “You don’t need to know! You’re too young!” This is the stage where young girls are trying to figure it all out, they’re self-esteem is such a fragile thing, they don’t need to be seeing movies where a girl pretends to sleep with about 5-10 guys in one week! It’s too much for them. They’re not mature enough. It just left me feeling sad I guess. Kids grow up too fast today and it’s unfortunate. It makes me nervous to have children.

From airbrushed models and celebrities on covers of magazines who set expectations extremely high for all women, to twits like Katy Perry singing about skin-tight jeans and kissing girls (and everything in-between) – sex is all around us. Everywhere you turn, there are half-naked girls, guys saying inappropriate things to women, people having sex on television shows, provocative song lyrics on every radio station, and much much more.

I guess my point is simply the fact that it’s unfair. It’s unfair to take away a young adults innocence. It’s unfair for Hollywood to dictate how we should look, or what we should wear. It’s unfair that chivalry is potentially dying. It’s unfair how quick teenagers are to have sex and how quickly they have to mature after doing so.

What can we do? It’s so overwhelming sometimes when I think of all of this, especially having younger sisters. I wonder what it’s like to be a parent, to want to protect your child, to be so busy and have so much going on that you can’t keep track of their every move… What we need is positivity and love. Love your children, tell them they’re beautiful and special. Surround yourself with empowering people, words, thoughts, actions. Know that there are amazing, respectful men out there. Know that you will accomplish your goals if you remain focused. Know that everyone makes mistakes, and of course you will, but you will learn from them and move forward. Know that celebrities don’t define you. Neither do pop stars, models, or magazines. Enjoy your favorite TV shows/reality shows, but take them with a grain of salt. Don’t complain about your body – go to the gym. Eat delicious food. Don’t eat too much junk. Everything in moderation, my dear. Wear makeup or don’t. Dye your hair or don’t. Be yourself, embrace who you are, strive everyday to be the best version of yourself. I guess I may sound like an old fart and I’m only 24, but this movie just made me think. And, hey…maybe that’s what it was supposed to do in the first place.

Lastly, choose happiness.

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2 thoughts on “Easy A

  1. Omg!!! You hit the nail right on the head!! Thanks so much for writing this AWESOME post!!! Parents need to be more vigilant about what their impressionable young teens watch. Parenting is such a difficult job& movies like this just undermine all their hard work…I agree it had its funny spots, but definitely should have been for 17and older!!! Keep up the good work sweetie! Godbless, luvu

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